Americans cheer across the U.S. for a once-in-a-lifetime cosmic event

admin   •   August 22, 2017   •   3020

Guest reacts to the total eclipse in the football stadium at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, U.S., August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 37°43’26” N 89°13’10” W. Reuters/Brian Snyder

“The way that there was just that spontaneous howl from everybody when it went dark, it was just, like, amazing. I’m very happy I was here,” said Celeste Rivard, a local resident from Medford, Oregon.

“I found it absolutely fabulous and I am elated with the experience. It just kind of tickled you, all over, it was wonderful, wonderful and I wish I could do it again but I won’t ever see something like that ever again,” said Stormy Shreves from Depoe Bay, Oregon.

Hundreds of people looked skyward in awe through protective glasses, telescopes, and cameras in Depoe Bay, Oregon on Monday as they became among the first to see the coast-to-coast total solar eclipse.

The eclipse first reached “totality” – the shadow cast when the sun is completely blocked by the moon – in Oregon at 10:15 a.m. PDT and began spreading eastward.

In Los Angeles, thousands of Angelenos hiked up to Los Angeles’ iconic Griffith Observatory for an eclipse viewing party.

“Once in a lifetime event, you won’t see an eclipse like this, you know, anytime soon, a great event to come and visit,” said Rich de Gout, a resident of the US Virgin Islands.

In Illinois, all 15,000 seats to the football stadium in Carbondale at Southern Illinois University were sold out.

It’s where eclipse totality lasted the longest in the U.S., although spectators were momentarily disappointed when clouds blocked out the view.

In Washington D.C, People gathered at the Washington Monument on the national mall in the nation’s capitol, including some who tried to view the spectacle using rigged cardboard boxes while U.S. Vice President Mike Pence took a look at the solar eclipse from his residence at the U.S. Naval Observatory.

“We’re going to go and look to the skies. We’re going to see something that Americans haven’t been able to see since 1918. It is extraordinary. We will be – I got this from Brad’s remarks — we will be in the ‘shadow of the moon’, isn’t that special to think about,” said U.S. Vice President Mike Pence.

The moon blocked out the sun on Monday as the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the United States after 99 years, which started from Oregon to South Carolina.

No area in the United States had seen a total solar eclipse since 1979, while the last coast-to-coast total eclipse took place in 1918. — Abi Valdez | UNTV News and Rescue

 

 

Pilot in Kobe Bryant helicopter crash may have become disoriented in heavy fog – NTSB

UNTV News   •   June 18, 2020

The pilot of a helicopter that crashed in foothills near Los Angeles, killing basketball great Kobe Bryant, his daughter, and all seven others on board, likely became disoriented in the fog, federal investigators said on Wednesday (June 17).

The National Transportation Safety Board report said pilot Ara Zobayan told air traffic controllers that his helicopter was climbing, when in fact it was descending shortly before slamming into a hillside outside the community of Calabasas on Jan. 26.

The NTSB said that pilots can become confused over an aircraft’s attitude and acceleration when they cannot see the sky or landscape around them, causing “spacial disorientation.”

“Without outside references or attention to the helicopter’s attitude display, the actual pitch and bank angles have the potential to be misperceived,” the NTSB said.

The findings came in a “public docket” released by the NTSB as it investigates the crash. The agency has not yet released its final report. (Reuters)

(Production: Omar Younis)

Emergency workers remove what appear to be human remains from Kobe Bryant crash site

Robie de Guzman   •   January 28, 2020

Weather conditions appear likely to come under the scrutiny of investigators probing the helicopter crash that killed former NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, his daughter and seven others near Los Angeles on Sunday (January 26), when overcast skies and fog grounded other aircraft.

Bryant’s Sikorsky S-76 chopper slammed into a steep hillside outside the town of Calabasas, California, about 40 miles (65 km) northwest of downtown Los Angeles, igniting a brush fire and spreading debris over a quarter-acre (1,000 square meters) of grassy terrain.

Hours later, Los Angeles County authorities said all nine people aboard the helicopter died in the crash.

On Monday (January 27), emergency workers began removing what appeared to be human remains from the crash site.

The deaths of Bryant, 41, and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, were confirmed by the National Basketball Association, as expressions of disbelief and grief poured in from fans, fellow athletes and politicians.

Bryant and his entourage were reported by local media to have been on their way to a sports academy in the nearby city of Thousand Oaks, where he was to have coached his daughter’s basketball team in a youth tournament.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board began arriving in the area on Sunday to launch separate crash investigations. (Reuters)

(Production: Omar Younis)

US accuses Iran of more than 1,000 deaths during protests

Jeck Deocampo   •   December 6, 2019

US Special Representative for Iran and Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State Brian Hook responds to a question from the news media during a press conference at the US State Department in Washington, DC, USA, 4 September 2019. EPA-EFE FILE/SHAWN THEW

Washington DC – The United States government on Thursday held Iran responsible for the death of more than 1,000 people in the recent protests that shook the country.

“It appears the regime could have murdered over 1,000 Iranian citizens since the protests began,” said State Department Special Representative for Iran, Brian Hook.

Hook, however, said he was not certain of that figure because “the regime blocks information.”

According to the US official, in one single protest in the southwestern city of Mahshahr, more than a hundred people died and when it was over, the bodies were loaded in trucks.

“We do not yet know where these bodies were taken, but we are learning more and more about how the Iranian regime treats its own people,” he added.

According to Washington, the number of deaths that occurred during the protests may have been five times the number estimated by Amnesty International, which in its latest report said 208 people lost their lives adding that the number was likely to be more.

Iran, on its part, said that the number reported by AI was not correct and claimed that the actual death toll was lower.

“The numbers and figures that are being given by hostile groups are utter lies and the statistics have serious differences with what they announced,” Iran’s judicial spokesperson Gholamhossein Esmaili said.

Protests broke out in Iran on Nov. 15 over rising oil prices and its rationing and led to criticism of the country’s theocratic system.

US President Donald Trump also mentioned the protests in Iran on Thursday.

The Iranian regime “has killed hundreds and hundreds of people in a very short period of time. They’re killing protesters. They turned down their internet system. People aren’t hearing what’s going,” said the president.

Days earlier, Trump accused Iran of killing “thousands and thousands” of people. EFE-EPA

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