Taiwan braces for typhoon Bailu, flights cancelled

Robie de Guzman   •   August 23, 2019   •   640

Boats are tied securely at a fishing port in Taiwan in preparation for the anticipated arrival of Typhoon Bailu.

Taiwan braced for Typhoon Bailu on Friday (August 23), prompting cancellations of domestic flights amid warnings of floods and high seas on the island.

Typhoon Bailu, categorised at the weakest typhoon level by Taiwan’s weather bureau, was expected to approach the island’s southeastern coast early on Saturday (August 24), weather officials said.

Bailu was carrying maximum winds of 126 km per hour (78 mph) as it approached Taiwan, the weather bureau said, adding that the storm could gain in strength and become the first typhoon to make landfall on the island in more than two years.

Thousands of people were moved to safety, most of them tourists on islands off the east coast, while dozens of domestic flights and ferry services were cancelled.

After passing over Taiwan, the typhoon is expected to cross the Taiwan Strait and hit the Chinese province of Fujian, forecasters said. (Reuters)

(Production: Fabian Hamacher)

China confirms 830 novel coronavirus cases, 25 deaths

UNTV News   •   January 24, 2020

Medical staff transfers a patient at Hospital of Wuhan Red Cross Society in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, 23 January 2020 (issued 24 January 2020). The outbreak of coronavirus has so far claimed 25 lives and infected more than 800 others, according to media reports. Authorities have extended a travel ban to eight cities in Hubei province, Wuhan, Huanggang, Ezhou, Chibi, Xiantao, Qianjiang, Zhijiang and Lichuan in an effort to contain the spread of the virus, which has so far been detected in the USA, Thailand, South Korea, Japan, Singapore and Taiwan.

The death toll from China’s new coronavirus has risen to 25, and the number confirmed cases in the Asian country to 830, the National Health Commission reported Friday.

At midnight local time (16:00 GMT on Thursday), the agency said that during the 23rd day, eight new deaths and 259 new cases were confirmed, affecting 29 provinces and autonomous regions throughout the country.

For the first time, a death was recorded in the province of Hebei, in the northeast, surrounding Beijing. Until then all victims had been registered in the province of Hubei, the capital of which is Wuhan, a city of about 11 million people and the epicenter of the outbreak.

At least 177 patients are in serious condition, while 34 have been discharged.

The health authorities carried out medical follow-ups with 9,507 people who had been in close contact with the infected, with 8,420 of those still under observation.

Wuhan has been on lockdown since Thursday to prevent further spread of the virus.

The authorities of other Hubei cities Huanggang, Ezhou, Chibi, Xiantao, Qianjiang, Zhijiang and Lichuan are now also subject to travel bans, the Hong Kong South China Morning Post said Friday.

In Wuhan, the Didi shared taxi service will also stop operating at midday local time (04:00 GMT time) at the request of the city’s outbreak command authority.

Outside of China, the Beijing source said that two of the four cases diagnosed in Thailand have been cured. There are also two cases in Japan, and one case each in the United States and Singapore.

Vietnam late Thursday confirmed its first cases. In Ho Chi Minh City, two tourists traveling from Wuhan — a 66-year-old father and his 28-year-old — son were hospitalized and underwent a series of tests to confirm the infection.

The Ministry of Health said in a statement Thursday night that both men are recovering and in “good condition.”

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc has urged the authorities to implement a series of security measures to prevent new cases, as well as increased controls at airports and border posts.

South Korea confirmed Friday a second case of infection in a 55-year-old South Korean who had been working in Wuhan and fell ill there, before he returned to Seoul on Wednesday where he was detected during screening at Gimpo airport, according to the Korean Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

A 35-year-old Chinese woman who arrived in Seoul from Wuhan was reported as the first case on Monday.

Taiwan also has a case, although Chinese authorities consider Taiwan a province of China and therefore include it in the national count.

The symptoms of the new coronavirus, called 2019-nCoV provisionally by the World Health Organization (WHO), are in many cases similar to those of a cold, but may be accompanied by fever and fatigue, dry cough and dyspnea (shortness of breath).

For its part, the WHO on Thursday decided against declaring an international emergency, although it asked China to increase surveillance in an epidemic that poses a “very high” risk nationally and internationally. EFE-EPA

jt-nc/igx/tw

China records 9 coronavirus deaths, 440 confirmed cases

UNTV News   •   January 22, 2020

A woman checks the mask on her child outside Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, 21 January 2020. EFE/EPA/YUAN ZHENG

By Javier Triana

Beijing
– The death toll from the new coronavirus originating in Wuhan, China, has increased to nine with 440 confirmed cases, the country’s National Health Commission reported Wednesday.

At midnight local time on Tuesday (16.00 GMT), 13 provinces had confirmed the 440 cases of infection, and the nine deaths were all located in Hubei province, of which Wuhan is the capital, NHC vice-minister Li Bin said Wednesday at a press conference in Beijing.

This hikes the casualty figures by three deaths and 149 people infected since the last report published on Tuesday.

The city of Wuhan has a population of 11 million people and is the epicenter of the outbreak of the new type of coronavirus (2019-nCov). It causes what is known as “Wuhan pneumonia” which, authorities said on Monday, can be spread through human contact.

Li said there is a possibility that the virus — the transmission route of which is yet to be completely traced — could mutate and that the epidemic could spread, but that no “super transmitter” with the capacity to infect many people from a single case has been detected.

He expressed concern about the spread of infection that could occur throughout Chinese New Year, the holiday period that officially begins Friday and constitutes the largest human migration on the planet, with tens of millions of Chinese returning to their hometowns.

He said: “During Chinese New Year, the surge [in people moving around the country] increases the risk of the epidemic’s spread and the difficulty of prevention and control. We must not take it lightly,”

However, Li said that the response of health services to the disease has managed to keep “fatalities and cases at a minimal level.”

“We have confidence we will defeat this disease,” the official concluded.

Meanwhile, Taiwan’s president Tsai-Ing Wen called on China to make fully transparent all its information on the virus to help other countries take proper measures to prevent its spread.

Taiwan has reported one confirmed case of the virus — a Taiwanese woman returning to the island from a business trip to Wuhan.

The patient reportedly felt ill for days before her trip home but wore a face mask on the return flight. She was quarantined on arrival and hospitalized.

Tsai said the woman was in a stable condition.

Taiwanese medical personnel are working with airline companies to detect potential cases of fever on board planes, a symptom of the SARS-like Wuhan virus along with difficulty breathing.

The World Health Organization has scheduled a Wednesday meeting to determine whether the current outbreak of coronavirus in China constitutes an international emergency.

Japan and South Korea have also reported one case each, while two others had already been confirmed in Thailand with another two announced Wednesday.

The United States announced its first case Tuesday, with the affected person hospitalized last week after experiencing symptoms of pneumonia and, according to US authorities, is in a stable condition after having recently traveled to Wuhan, the country’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

The patient returned from China on Jan. 15, two days before US authorities ordered all travelers entering from Wuhan to be monitored for viral illness at the airports in Los Angeles and San Francisco, and at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. EFE-EPA

jt/tw

Lifesaver: How to treat fireworks-related burns and injuries

Robie de Guzman   •   December 31, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – The government has been calling on the public to ditch fireworks and other pyrotechnic devices for safer noise-maker alternatives to avoid any injuries during the celebration of the holidays.

However, there are some people who just can’t help themselves from setting those firecrackers off so UNTV’s Lifesaver program has prepared first-aid tips on how to treat burns and injuries related to the use of fireworks.

Lifesaver program host, UNTV News and Rescue Manager Benedict Galazan, said there are different first aid treatments for different types of fireworks accidents.

He, however, stressed that these are only temporary measures as victims should be immediately rushed to the nearest hospital.

Here are the first-aid tips:

  • For first degree burns, the burned or injured area should be washed under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes to ease the pain and remove traces of chemical powder.
  • Cover the burned area using a clean cloth and, if necessary, immediately bring the victim to the hospital.

First-degree burns are considered mild and result in pain and reddening of the skin.

  • For second degree burns, run cool water on the wound for 10 to 15 minutes to stop the bleeding and ease the pain.
  • Cover the wound with a clean cloth or plastic wrap then bring the victim to the nearest hospital.

Second-degree burns affect the epidermis and lower layer of the skin and may cause pain, redness, and blistering.

When blistering occurs, the swollen area of the skin should not be popped.

“‘Yung mga blister o paltos ay huwag puputukin. Kasi iyan po ang pinaka-defense mechanism ng katawan ‘yan na kapag may heat na naramdaman ang katawan, magpo-produce siya ng liquid para ‘yun din ang makatulong sa pagcool-down ng burn,” Galazan said.

  • For third-degree burns, run the wound on cool water for 10 to 15 minutes to stop the bleeding and ease the pain.
  • Carefully put pressure on the injured area to control the bleeding.
  • Do NOT apply toothpaste, cream or any oil-based ointment to the wound or burn.
  • Cover the injured area with a clean cloth or plastic wrap then bring the victim to the hospital.

Third-degree burns affect the dermis and deeper skin tissues and may result in white or blackened, charred skin that may be numb.

  • For injured fingers, hands and other limbs, Lifesaver advises to run the injured part under cool water. Do NOT use ice.
  • If the fingers are still intact, run it as well on cool water.
  • If some fingers or other body parts are dismembered or lost, apply pressure using a tourniquet or any device (bandage and stick, rope or belt) to a limb or extremity to limit – but not stop – the flow of blood.
  • Also, try to look for the dismembered finger, and wrap them in a clean cloth. Place them inside a sealed plastic bag and put it in ice.
  • Bring the victim and the dismembered body part to the nearest hospital.

Dismembered limbs need to be brought with the victim to the hospital as these may still be reattached through surgery.

  • For eye injuries, flush the affected eye with cool water to remove any traces of firecracker powder.
  • Do NOT scratch or touch the injured eye.
  • If it is bleeding, use gauze or a paper cup to cover and protect the injured eye. Be careful not to put pressure on the eye.
  • Bring the patient to the nearest hospital

For ingestion or firecracker or its powder, here are the first aid tips:

  • Let the patient drink raw egg whites. Health experts recommend six to eight egg whites to a child and eight to 12 to an adult.
  • The patient should not attempt to throw up the ingested firecracker to prevent further damage.
  • Bring the victim to the nearest hospital.

Remember, if the wound is larger than the size of the palm of the hand, immediately bring the victim to the nearest hospital or call emergency medical services such as 8-911-UNTV.

Watch the episode of Lifesaver below for more first aid tips on firecracker burns:

– RRD (Correspondent Harlene Delgado contributed to this report)

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