Trump plan to offer citizenship to 1.8M undocumented immigrants

admin   •   January 26, 2018   •   2849

The other 1.1 million would be immigrants who did not apply for DACA but are eligible for the scheme.

The White House has outlined an immigration plan that would allow 1.8 million people to become US citizens in exchange for funding of a border wall.

The framework was described by a senior Trump aide in a conference call to Republicans ahead of legislative negotiations with Democrats.

The proposed bill, to be unveiled on Monday, requests $25 billion dollars in funds for a wall on the Mexican border.

The blueprint sets out a 10-12-year path to citizenship for 1.8 million people.

This includes some 700,000 so-called Dreamers, immigrants who illegally entered the US as children and were protected from deportation under an Obama-era program, deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA).

The other 1.1 million would be immigrants who did not apply for DACA but are eligible for the scheme.

The White House framework also seeks to end two other initiatives often criticized by President Donald Trump.

It proposes to curtail so-called chain migration, permitting US residents only to get visas for their spouse and children, not for extended family members.

The White House also wants to scrap the diversity visa lottery, under which 50,000 people from around the world every year win green cards at random. — Reuters

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Trump acknowledges election defeat, prepares transition for new admin

Aileen Cerrudo   •   January 8, 2021

Outgoing United States President Donald Trump has acknowledged his election defeat after the US Congress formally certified the victory of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris in the 2020 November elections.

“A new administration will be inaugurated on January 20th, my focus now turns into ensuring a smooth and orderly transition of power, this moment calls for healing ang reconciliation,” he said.

He also condemned the violence that occurred after several pro-Trump protesters breached the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C.

“Demonstrators who infiltrated the capital had defiled the seat of the democracy, to those who engage in the acts of violence and destruction, you do not represent our country, and to those who broke the law, you will pay,” he said.

Meanwhile, Facebook and Instagram imposed an indefinite suspension on Trump’s social media accounts. The ban will remain in place for at least two weeks or after the inauguration of Biden.

“We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great. Therefore, we are extending the block we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said.

Trump invites Duterte, other ASEAN leaders for March Summit

Aileen Cerrudo   •   January 20, 2020

ASEAN Summit and Related Meetings in Manila epa06325844 US President Donald J. Trump (L) talks to Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (R) before the opening ceremony of the 31st Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit in Manila, Philippines,13 November 2017. The Philippines is hosting the 31st ASEAN Summit and Related Meetings from 10 to 14 November. EPA-EFE/MARK R. CRISTINO / POOL

United States (US) President Donald Trump has invited President Rodrigo Duterte and nine other leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nation (ASEAN) for the US-ASEAN Summit in March.

Trump previously invited the ASEAN leaders on November 1, 2019 and reiterated his invitation on January 9, 2020.

“This will provide an excellent opportunity for us to broaden and deepen our cooperation on matters of great importance to the nearly one billion people in the United States and ASEAN nations that we have the privilege to represent,” Trump said in his invitation.

However, Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo said there is still no official response on whether President Duterte will accept the invitation of the US president.—AAC

US gov’t to deny green cards to immigrants using welfare programs

Robie de Guzman   •   August 13, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – The administration of US President Donald Trump announced on Monday a new policy that seeks to deny green cards to immigrants deemed likely to rely on government public welfare programs such as food stamps, housing assistance and Medicaid.

In a news release, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the rule that “clearly defines long-standing law to better ensure that aliens seeking to enter and remain in the United States – either temporarily or permanently – are self-sufficient and rely on their own capabilities and the resources of family members, sponsors and private organizations rather than on public resources.”

The DHS said the final rule revised the definition of “public charge” to incorporate consideration of more kinds of public benefits received, which the Department believes will better ensure that applicants subject to the public charge inadmissibility ground are self-sufficient.

The term “public charge” is defined as an individual who receives one or more designated public benefits for more than 12 months, in the aggregate, within any 36-month period.

The rule further defines the term “public benefit” to include any cash benefits for income maintenance, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), most forms of Medicaid, and certain housing programs.

The new policy amends regulations by prescribing how DHS will determine whether an alien is inadmissible to the United States based on their likelihood of becoming a public charge in the future as set forth in the Immigration and Nationality Act.

It addresses the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to permit an alien to submit a public charge bond in the context of adjustment of status applications.

The rule also makes nonimmigrant aliens who have received certain public benefits above a specific threshold generally ineligible for an extension of stay and change of status.

The regulation also excludes from the public benefits definition those received by individuals who are serving in the Ready Reserve component of the U.S. armed forces, and their spouses and children; those received by certain international adoptees and children acquiring U.S. citizenship; Medicaid for aliens under 21 and pregnant women; Medicaid for school-based services (including services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act); and Medicaid benefits for emergency medical services.

It also makes non-immigrant aliens in the United States who have received designated public benefits above the set threshold ineligible for change of status and extension of stay if they received the benefits after obtaining the non-immigrant status they seek to extend or from which they seek to change, the agency said.

“For over a century, the public charge ground of inadmissibility has been part of our nation’s immigration laws. President Trump has delivered on his promise to the American people to enforce long-standing immigration law by defining the public charge inadmissibility ground that has been on the books for years,” said USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli.

“Throughout our history, self-sufficiency has been a core tenet of the American dream. Self-reliance, industriousness, and perseverance laid the foundation of our nation and have defined generations of hardworking immigrants seeking opportunity in the United States ever since. Through the enforcement of the public charge inadmissibility law, we will promote these long-standing ideals and immigrant success,” he added.

The regulation also explains how the USCIS will exercise its discretionary authority, in limited circumstances, to offer an alien inadmissible only on the public charge ground the opportunity to post a public charge bond.

The minimum bond amount is set at $8,100 while the actual bond amount will be dependent on the individual’s circumstances.

The US government, however, stressed this regulation does not apply to humanitarian-based immigration programs for refugees, asylees, Special Immigrant Juveniles (SIJs), certain trafficking victims (T non-immigrants), victims of qualifying criminal activity (U non-immigrants), or victims of domestic violence (VAWA self-petitioners), among others. 

The DHS said the final rule supersedes the 1999 Interim Field Guidance on Deportability and Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds.

It will take effect on October 15 or 60 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register.

The USCIS said it will apply the public charge inadmissibility final rule only to applications and petitions postmarked or submitted electronically on or after the effective date.

Applications and petitions already pending with USCIS will be adjudicated based on the 1999 Interim Guidance.   

The USCIS said it will provide information and additional details to the public as part of public outreach related to the implementation of this rule.

Engagement sessions will also be conducted to ensure the public understands which benefits are included in the public charge inadmissibility rule.

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